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developing energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >>> welcome back to the second half of "outfront." we start with stories we care about where we focus with reporting from the front lines. today on the two-year anniversary of the egyptian revolution that ousted hosni mubarak from power, the streets were filled not with peace but with violence. protesters for and against president mohamed morsi clashed with police, at least seven died. morsi did not address the country but tweeted on twitter. he called on people to uphold the noble principles of the revolution. >>> apple is no longer the world's biggest company. the title belongs to exxonmobil. apple shares plummeted on the heels of disappointing earnings resulted and plunged over 12%. apple's market cap first passed exxonmobil on august 9th, 2011. it's been sitting pretty 18 months, seemingly untouchable. tonight it is
, and that they that as a person that has covered the environment for as long as i have, the surprise me. you get into hydraulic fracturing which is now all over the news. the interior department today is going to put out rules for fracking on public land. correct me if i wrong, but you almost make the case that that corporate philosophy gave them a blood spot. even more surprising because you make an amazing point, and i remember this. as a young engineer the company, he was using the technique. and so do you think in that one case, that corporate philosophy of manager risks, make sure we make a certain return on what we do hindered them from tapping into what is now is used economic opportunity in this country with natural gas? >> there were slow, but they are often slow. then there decisive. they get there late in by there weekend. they've never had a reputation faugh. they have a story they tell themselves about their successes. and they have some degree by and large their strength is financial and operating. generally if they fail to discover something for themselves they can buy it. they've been trying to
think that, as a person that's covered energy and environment for as long as i have -- this surprised me. you get into hydraulic fracturing which is now all over the news. today going to put out rauls for fracking on public lands. and you almost -- and you almost make the case that corporation prosecute -- that corporate philosophy gave them a blind spot when it came to high drawlic fracturing, and you make an amazing point that rex tillerton, as a young engineer at the company, actually was using the technique and so do you think in that one case in the fracking case, that corporate philosophy of, let's manage our risks, make sure we make a certain return on what we do -- hinder them from tapping into what is now this huge gas, huge economic opportunity in this country with natural gas? >> guest: they were slow but they're often slow and then they're dissive. so they get to places late and then buy their way in. that's their pattern. never had a great reputation as the greatest spoil goss discoverers. i'm sure they have some wins and a story they tell. thes about successes in exploratio
, more nationalism and an economic environment that people are not totally pessimistic, but i think they expect to see more going forward. >> an thonenny jenkins from barclay's. good to see you. thanks for joining us. pick up with barclay's. what are the expectations of what they're going to do with that transformation and job cuts? but he clearly made the point. he said when we had strong revenue growth, the banking system as a whole didn't have to worry about cost. now we've got the right costs for the new environment we're in. and is this a cross to the board picture? >> definitely. banking ultimately is such for the underlying economy. so i think it doesn't take an economy to tell us that the next couple of years is going to be choppy and not the growth we've had for the last 20 years. banking has to go back to basics. fist, think about your revenue and cost base. here on the cost base, huge improvements. they've always been unmanaged because the revenue is growing so, you know, clearly matched to pay people twice as much as we have to. today, people working from i.t. to legal t
the atmosphere here. environment experts believe lawmakers are taking the situation seriously. >> there is a political ownership of that change. the government is certainly more responsive, but in terms of action, and implementation is a problem and there is a lot of slack, even now. >> whenever the experts say, it is people with breathing problems to suffer the most. this man has had asthma all his life and his condition gets worse. >> we cannot inhale that. we're not comfortable breathing that air. i usually go to the park in the morning but i don't feel like it when there is smog. >> local authorities are planning to place electric signboards to warn drivers about pollution and encourage them to keep their cars at home. activists say it's a start but what they want to see is a better public transport policy and a secure cycling lane it to encourage drivers to leave their cars at home and keep pollution and smog at bay. >> the president of venezuela remained in cuba where he has been treated for cancer. a spokesman says he's overcome a respiratory infection and is still poli
climate is about, which is but the environment was about what led by who? teddy roosevelt. it was embraced by men like russell train, great republicans. it was a terrific republican sense of leadership. nelson that, the rockefeller. >> richard nixon? >> clean air act. i mean, the man that took the lead out of the air. richard nixon. the man who saved the waters of this country, richard nixon. the last great liberal president this country had. i would just like to see as rise above this pattern -- petty partisan bickering that i hear in this panel. >> this speech laid out the thing that we have to deal with. the things the government has to be involved in. the air, the water goes from state to state, city to city. one place cannot do it. it has to be the business -- the regulation of how you protect with all of that has to be the business of the federal government. >> could i get half a minute of the bottle? cap and trade worked well for acid rain. acid rain stays in our country. i am not against regulated carbon. if you can get china and india to do something. if they do not, we are spinni
, the impact is stronger because they're less affected by the direct environment. >> are we enter ago harder market? which is to say can insurance companies start to raise premiums across the board? >> it varies a lot by line of bit in my country, but certainly post super storm sandy there will be hardening of rates. in the uk, though, with the rates going down, even though motor has been not that profitable -- >> why is that. >> because the competition is a pretty competitive environment. >> and we had changes in the motor race, though. we've had a big eu change on the agenda. >> yeah. >> we don't know how that's going to come out in the wash, do we? >> that changes things around. but in the short-term, it does mean that the markets are a little more volatile and it has been a sizable change. >> it's just unfortunate to some degree that these natural disasters which affect many people and are stressful events to live through then cause insurance premium toes rise, which sounds like that's what's happening in part of the u.s. >> it varies, but long-term insurers will look to make profit over
rates. the bank announced on tuesday that it will provide an appropriate interest rate environment to support growth as inflation risks lessen. >>> members of the japanese cabinet approved the biggest budget on record for 2013. it totals over $1 trillion. the draft budget reflects shinzo abe's determination to stimulate japanese government by boosting government expenditures. public works spending will increase for the first time in four years. the government plans to spend over $770 billion to implement its policies. that's up about 3% in yen terms from the current fiscal year. it has earmarked more than $240 billion for servicing government debt or an increase of over 1%. also for the first time in four years, tax revenues are expected to exceed what the government would get by issuing new bonds. the government expects tax revenues to total over $473 billion, or nearly 2% more than in this fiscal year. meanwhile, new bond offerings will fall by 3% to about $470 billion. japan still relies on government bond sells for 46% of its total revenue. the outstanding balance of government
. it is a shame for his legacy, but can anybody conceivably in this environment say we have to raise taxes on the middle class if they're in elected office? >> the reality is the present tax code is a disaster. yes, you can raise tax revenue and you can get people behind it if indeed you do it by saying let's scrap huge chunks of the present tax code that make no sense in going the direction of a tax code that is competitive to the rest of the world the tax court hurts us, and frankly will bring down what i call the compliance tax. how many people do their own taxes now and pay millions if not billions of dollars in the country as a whole to get somebody else to figure this thing out. i would pay a higher rate if i knew i didn't have to pay the extra $2000 cut $2500 per year to the accountant to tell me what its supposed to be. it is a serious one. liz: texas have made more liars than a golf hats, but if you're going to do tax reform it took years, you have to start it now, right? >> raise taxes on the middle class, the budget agreement did. starting january 1my own experience of a governo
outside of the normal in the office business environment. i met barry who runs real estate business. he joined my board. i bought his company call from davos. liz: there are deals at least the seeds are sown here? >> that's right. it creates personal relationships you know that create the relationships outside to make it work. liz: real estate business genesis of it was here has been huge for you guys. >> we started with frank. bought grub and el lis and brought the two together. very interest rates are great for commercial real estate. you can finance it cheaply. low interest rates is ails good for somebody. not good in the finance business but in the real estate business. liz: not good good for savers but good for that is right part of your business which brought in a lot of revenues. what is the most interesting conversation you've been a part of this time around? >> i met the t-shock i only word is the prime minister of ireland. what i thought was really interesting, he was very focused on business. he came here and his whole group is here to say we're open for business. we're focus
still being a drog for your business? >> you know, it certainly doesn't help that the environment here has been very difficult. there's a huge swing in sentiment over the last three or four months. the sentiment is ahead of reality at this point. but in terms of the pick up of our business, it's been meaningful and the first three or four weeks of this year have started very, very strong. >> mario draghi was there talking about banking supervision, largest banks will be supervised from frankfurt in the ecb. how does that all impact your european union? >> well, the direct impact, of course, is limited in as much as our principal regulators and supervisors are in the u.s. of course, we do operate in all of these markets and, therefore, our local units do have supplies by local rules. that goes without saying. i think the key issue is that regulatory certainty and stability and a revival testament in europe benefits the sector, benefits the markets and certainly, therefore, will benefit us indirectly. but i would say the direct impact on what we do day-to-day is somewhat limited, of cour
kangaroos. ♪ chevron has been developing energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >>> our second story "outfront", a dire warning. the threat from drug-resistant bacteria is so serious that it could trigger a national emergency, similar to a terrorist attack. some pretty stunning words and it sure caught my attention, and "outfront" tonight, we're lucky to have dr. oz, host of "the dr. oz show." i've always wondered, people who go to the doctor every time they get sick and get antibiotics, are they causing a are problem? are we going to have all these things be resistant to antibiotics? is she exaggerating? >> she's not exaggerating. the reality is, we can't keep up with the bacteria. they're going to change much more rapidly than we develop new medications at the current pace, as we take care of people who are sicker and sicker, we get folks to survive cancer, transpl
. ♪ chevron has been developing energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >>> time for the ridiculous. tonight we're adding goats. yeah, that's what i said, goats. all of them. goats in general, and a few goats in particular like the one that stole the show from a reporter in florida who was just trying to do her job and report on a county fair. >> the judging is complete. come on out and meet the winners. the goats will be here through saturday. and they're very friendly. linda carson, abc 7 -- would you not eat my pants? ah! i'm fine. >> are you okay, dear? >> oh, yes. not again. >> we can never get enough. >> did you get it? >> thankfully, wwsb reporter linda carson was not hurt. and she's a great sport about it. she took the whole thing in stride and laughed about it. i hope she doesn't mind when i say, let's roll that one again,
energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >>> we are back with tonight's "outer circle" where we reach out to sources around the world. we go to south africa where the search is on for thousands of crocodiles near the botswana border. rising floodwaters were threatening about 15,000 crocs on a breeding farm. the owners opened the farm's gates to relieve pressure. more than half the crocs or the loose. maybe that's good because they're not going to be turned into handbags. robyn curnow is following the story. >> reporter: fair to say the people who are trying to round up the crocs are doing it carefully. we understand the recapturing the mostly taking place at nighttime because crocodiles eyes grow red when lights reflected into them. in this largely farming rural area, residents are being warned not to try and capture the crocodiles by grabbing hold of their ta
from unstable environments, there are consequences. extremism takes root, our interests suffer, our security at home is threatened. >> i thought that was such -- that's hillary clinton testifying this week and i thought that line was so important because it kind of disstills down i think the operational theory in intervention here or american leadership, which is when america is absent, especially from unstable environments, there are consequences. extremism takes root, our interests suffer, security at home is threatened. horace, that seems like a proposition you don't agree with and libya was a failed implementation of that view. >> first of all, hillary clinton has a very short memory, so the kind of leadership she's talking about, we have to be very clear, what kind of leadership we want in africa. the people in africa want peace. they want unity and they want reconstruction. they do not want wars. and what happened in libya is a sign of the kind of militarism we've seen all over africa from the u.s. africa command. 50,000 libyans have been killed out of this intervention. the w
damage the irish countryside. our environment correspondent, matt mcgrath, reports now from the irish republic. >> one shining light in ireland's economic gloom is green energy, especially wind, where investment is booming all across the landscape. today's deal is part of that expansion. supporters say it will save money for british consumers as it promises to be cheaper than electric generated from wind in the north sea. but to work, the plan requires hundreds of new turbines to be built all across the flat and boggy irish midland. building wind farms on bogland has already been done successfully here in on the island. but to generate the green electricity needed to power three million u.k. homes is going to require much bigger turbines than the ones you see here. in fact, it will need some of the biggest ever built in the world. campaigners say the giant wind farms will be a blot on the landscape of a country that trades on its unspoiled green image. irish ministers disagree, saying the energy deal is just a first step, and tough planning laws will protect the countryside. >> i thin
his decision making environment so that he and the president can make decisions on the basis of the best possible information 789 that's what i do. >> dr. carter as always thank you for joining us. you for joining us. >> good to be here it's been a long, tough year. a real test of what i'm made of. there were times i thought of giving in, but i did it. opened up that navy federal savings account and now we have this... ah. did it all online... it was easy. i don't hear any sweating. civilians... psh. 4 million members. 4 million stories. navy federal credit union. . >>> army clerk in the show we heard from -- earlier in the show we heard from ash carter on how the penalty gone is preparing itself for deep budget cuts if congress fails. many in washington are optimistic the worst can be averted after how's republicans a-- house republicans agreed to suspend the debt ceiling. a measure that the democratically controlled senate agreed to vote on. we went to capitol hill to meet with senator mac thornberry of texas who's the number two republican. i asked him what he thought abou
to a changing political environment." >> first of all, on that comment, it is deeply offensive. democrats did the same thing in 2008. i believe andrew cuomo may have said the same thing in 2008, and he was -- >> got a pass. >> yeah. he was not hammered as much. >> he got hammered for that? i read that someone got a pass for it. >> some have gotten a pass. anyway, i think cuomo got hammered pretty hard. but this is -- i saw, richard haass, mr. i'm not going to speculate on anything that's not in front of my nose, you know, this is important. this is an important story because the guy who has been the de facto leader of the republican party over the past four years since george w. bush left town is roger els. he's run the party, he's run the conservative movement. when roger els decides she's not worth the trouble, then that means that conservatism's moving in a new direction. i talked about what happened this weekend at "the national review" institute's talk. i was really surprised. really surprised by what i heard. and heartened, whether it was bill kristol or john hatoritz. also scott walker
. a portfolio that does well in different environments. so much of the driver of many asset class returns is based on how events actually transpire relative to expectations. so there's a certain discounted growth rate in equities. there's a certain discounted growth rate, certain assets. you can look at what's priced in. and then what happens is, you need to have environments a quarter of your portfolio, in assets that do well, when growth is faster than expected. or, a quarter when it's slower than expected. a quarter when inflation is higher than expected and a quarter when inflation is lower than expected. so you need to create a good structured portfolio, then you can make your bets. but this is a whole conversation on how to invest. >> here's a question just about bets. you know, you're making the argument, and explaining the need to have a diversified portfolio. but most people have diversified portfolio follow the market. meaning, whatever the s&p 500 is ultimately you're going to be up or down, somewhere around there. you, and some of your peers consistently outperform the market.
ceo survey released this week, 52% saw no change from the current tepid economic environment. 28% saw decline and 18% said things will get better. it is still an improvement from last year when 48% predicted a decline. the last few years of recovery followed by slow downs of political crisis, of new terror attacks from north africa have made people weary of excessive optimism. things are stable, crises have been contained, there's some growth on the horizon, but no one's ready to declare that we've turned any corners. there are no bulls in davos. no countries taking center stage. one symbol of the mood, the big splashy parties that companies like google used to throw have been quietly discontinued. not that google couldn't afford it, by the way. they just had their first year with $50 billion in revenues. underlying this caution, i believe, is a sense that growth that people had gotten used to, economic growth of the past that countries and companies had hoped for in the future just doesn't seem likely. the imf released a new report this week with growth numbers that are low. lower th
environment. 28% saw a decline and 18% said things will get better. it is still an improvement from last year, when 48% predicted a decline. the last few years of recovery, followed by slowdowns of political crisis, of new terror attacks from north africa, have made people wary of excessive optimism. these are stable, crises have been contained. there's some growth on the horizon, but no one's ready to declare that we have turned any corners. there are no bulls in davos this year, no countries taking center stage. one symbol of the mood, the big splashy parties that companies like google used to throw have been quietly discontinued. not that google couldn't afford it, they just had that their first year with $50 billion in revenue. it's a sense of growth that people have gotten used to, growth that companies have hoped for in the future just doesn't seem likely. growth numbers that are low, lower than they had projected only a few months ago. the world is coming to grips with the fact that the financial crisis might have ushered in not a few years, but a decades of slow growth. and we're not
% per year. all right? so higher rate environments don't necessarily mean, or not mutually exclusive of positive and constructive equity market returns. >> charles, i want to ask barry the same question after i ask you, but i would -- give me a number on where you think it would hurt? because i could see, i could see all the way up to 4.5% being construed as a positive. which is still such a low historical number for a ten-year, for whatever, i could see where that would help savers, it would help, you know, the return on some pension plans, and it would indicate economic growth much better than we have right now. it's something that japan wishes they had for the past 20 years, because it would at least indicate some economic activity. i can't even imagine it would be a headwind all the way up to 4.5% or 5% for equities. i don't know about the mortgage market. what do you think, charles? >> it's not just the absolute level, joe. >> but years from now, two, three years. we're going to get back there eventually, right? >> eventually i think we will. and i think if the path is a control
and fairies in a garden environment that appeared on the world in about 1918, in through the early 1920's and took the world by storm. how do you have these? the girl that took one of the first series of photographs in 1917 was my mother. hang on a minute. so your mother was, what frances griffiths. so the story is that these two children, one aged 16, one aged ten believed there were fairies in the bottom of their garden. and in order to convince their father they took a camera and they took photographs, and that was in july and august of 1917. and those two photographs, as i understand it were those two. is that right? that's right. so which is your mother? this is my mother here. that's your mother. like anybody interested in that period i know those photos intimately. i've seen them reproduced so many times, and so, to actually have the real photographs on the table in front of me with one of the cameras that had taken the photographs, and to be talking to the lady owner who is the daughter of one of the children involved, was actually more than i could hack.
of the pressure of lawsuits, pressure of the regulatory environment, the cost, what should investors expect in terms of that pressure this year? can you say that's behind or still dealing with these things? >> we still work through lawsuits on mortgage-backed security side and other areas. but compared to what we have gone through the last few years, it is largely behind us. >> have you been surprised at the move in your stock as well as the interest in banks over the last year? >> our stock was up over 100% last year and that's, you know, i think was a performance reflecting in the capital and the uncertainties around capital levels and things like that, that came through during the year. but we got the best franchise in the business. we have great earnings power. it has been covered up and you see the last couple of quarters, by putting away a few of the things that happened in the past. we're very confident that as that comes through, the people see the value in this company. >> we'll be watching eagerly. thanks very much. >> thank you. >> we appreciate it. brian moynihan joining us. car
who are mobile and work and a global environment and a large market. it is for the non college-bound people who used to go into factory jobs, blue-collar jobs that have been disappearing because of global labor competition. this brings back something on both sides. >> i talked to young people lot. mentoring them was real important. our industry changed a lot. it used to be joe roughneck out there on the raid. -- rig. today it is so highly technical. we see so many people out there. use the computers up on our raised floor. -- use the computers up on our -- you see computers up on our rig floor. there are guys following what we are doing, making real time decisions. it is a different world today than it was before. an incredibly dirty business. -- nerdy business. it has become that. >> we had an odd editorial meeting about two years ago in which someone came in and was talking to us about the need for investments in wind power and also in mandating the use of gas. multiple choice question for you. is he a fool, or a villain? [laughter] >> i think he learned a lesson or two with
open the environment is a good thing? >> you will think this is shameless sucking up, but the best blog out there is national review online. [applause] i look at it every day. the other one i recommend to you is mickey kaus. he writes a blog that is in the daily collar and he is a brilliant new liberal. he ran against boxer in a primary. he had a budget of about $600. he ran for the senate. but he is an interesting writer. he is a liberal who is extremely open and able to see through arguments in a way that is rare. so if you're going to read a little, you should read him. yes, i think the openness is very good. it is that we basically have democratized the political discourse. the problem is that it will kill the mainstream -- the traditional way of doing business in media. i am not talking about liberal or conservative. there is nobody that has been able to come up with a business model that will preserve the newspapers in the long run. so i'm not sure where leads. but right now, ladies leading to replace where would we have known for 100 years, whether leading newspapers, magazines,
question and they always say it's about packaging and the environment changes and then they move up and the other guys move down. >> you mentioned messaging and policy, and what you did not mention was mess efrenger and i generally the pieces that are front and center. >> i asked a question earlier that i just basically ripped off from you so you would be proud. >> thanks. >> chairman rinse priebus just reelected every two years, here what he said about the republican renewal. >> we must compete in every state in every region, building relationships with communities we haven't before. at the rnc, we are dropping the red and blue state analysis. we must be a party concerned about every american in every neighborhood. >> the rhetoric, we've heard a lot of from different members of the gop, but here's my question, molly. how did priebus get another two years after such a bad year for republicans? >> there is a strong feeling among republicans that whatever happened in november was not reince priebus' fault, it was not the rnc's fault. a lot of it is blamed on the romney campaign which
and we must leave a healthy environment and clean energy sources to our children and grandchildren. the missing piece is congress. congress is sleep walking through history. it is time to wake up. the national oceanic and atmospheric administration has confirmed that 2012 was the hottest year in the contiguous united states on record ever. and this one wasn't a close call. it did not come down to the wire. 2012 was a full degree fahrenheit higher than the previous record year. a full degree fahrenheit higher than the previous record year. put that in context because one degree may not sound like a lot. but when you average it across an ire year, it is a huge shift. the previous warmest u.s. year on record -- 1998 -- was 4.2 degrees fahrenheit warmer than the coldest year on record, 1917. take the warmest year on record, is th1998 -- until now -- and yu take the coldest year -- 1917 -- and the span is only 4.2 degrees fahrenheit. so a 2.1 jump fahrenheit over 2011 is a seriously big change. but we're just starting to heat up. the most optimistic estimate for the end of the century i
't confirm that they did it. there's a new environment in that region. before i let you go, north korea is threatening another underground nuclear test. how credible is this threat? >> it's very credible. we have seen in the past that they have used this to their political advantage. the chinese have put pressure on them at their u.s. request. that's a good thing. >> to not do it? >> to not do it. however, they are pushing the envelope and i believe that this is this new, young leader who's decided that he needs to show that he's in charge, gain the credibility from the military and if that means further isolation through a nuclear test, i think he'll do it. >> kim jong-un. the next day he's launching a missile or threatening a nuclear test underground. i don't know which direction he's moving. >> i think he believes that he needs to get the supporter to prove that he's a hard liner and a leader and will continue -- the only way to do well in that country is being part of the military infrastructure and so he needs to keep that loyal if he's going to stay in charge. i think what you're
certainly aware of the increasing threat environment. i not only was briefed on that, i testified to that effect. and there were constant evaluations going on. but no one, not the ambassador, security professionals, the intelligence community ever recommended closing that mission. and the reason they didn't was because the ongoing threat environment had up until the spring before our terrible attack in benghazi been a result of post-conflict conditions. that is something that we're familiar with all over the world. yes, there were some attacks, as you have said, but our evaluation of them and the recommendation by the security professionals was that those were all manageable because we had a lot of that around the world. i mean, there is a long list of attacks that have been foiled, assassination plots that have been prevented. so this is not some -- you know, one off event. this is considered in an atmosphere of a lot of threats and dangers. and at the end of the day, you know, there was a decision made that this would be evaluated but it would not be closed and, unfortunately, w
the right environment is the most important. how we can create this environment today with this kind of unstability, we need political stability. we need peace. we have struggle between the palestinians and israelis and egypt. we have to talk about it and be very frank to see how we can get to the end of this. for this reason, yes, frankly speaking i'm not very optimistic about all today. if i ask anyone what you want me to talk to about, talk about democracy, freedom, transparency, governments, rulers. let us work for this and this is very important. >> let me ask --, let me ask someone who has worked with some of these institutions under the most ex-rd nary conditions. you have helped functioning institution in the west bank. you created an economy that created extraordinary growth over the last three years and you've done it under very adverse circumstances. so what would be your advice to people trying to build these institutions? >> thank you. honestly i continue to the effort help the institutions not just myself and to get ready for the emergence of fully independent and state
sporting event environment. it's held every two years in lee own, france, and is named for the famed french chefl paul bow kus. each competitor from each country has 5 1/2 hours to present one meat dish and one fresh fish from scratch. >> it's food that even foodies might find a little frue-frue. it's over the top. >> over the top is really the way to put it. you're really try dog food that will wow the spectator, wow the chefs visually, technically, and also whenever it hits their mouth. >> reporter: the europeans dominate the competition. the best an american has ever done is come in sixth. richard and corey are expected to change that. this $150,000 kitchen in the bunker at the greenbriar is the exact replica of the one they will use in france. >> we actually took chalk and chalked out on the floor basically exactly where everything was going to be. >> they've piped in actual crowd noise from past competitions. their war room complete with a countdown clock is where they plot their practice sessions and review photos of past winning platters. rosendale works out with a trainer nearly eve
've got to get back to an environment where we have positive business investment. the easiest way to do it by the way is look at the tax side. ashley: yeah. >> we can still have a tax structure that is completely progressive but we have to continue to focus on structures that will enhance the ability for, for businesses to invest. ashley: that's right. >> moving tax rates, capital gains and dividend taxes from 15 to 24%, and taxing the rich is not a pro-growth policy. ashley: have to leave it right there. ed lazear, thanks so much for joining us. really appreciate it. >> thank you. tracy: especially when the rich keep moving. ashley: that's right. good point. tracy: follow the golfers. as we do every 15 minutes we check the markets now. nicole petallides on the floor of the stock exchange. good day for the drugmakers, huh, nicole? >> it is. look at some names on the move after earnings, latest drugs, clinical trials and mostly good news here, look at bristol-myers up 2 1/2% for bmy. they did beat street expectations. they're posting gains doing very well with that. they settled claims w
consider the historically low interest rate environment and the fed saying they will continue to pump money into the economy to stimulate it, you will see the stock market continued to rally. this stock market knows that the government will continue to try to prop things up and that will continue to push these stock prices higher. dennis: how much longer can you continue to punish the sector this is the only direct interchange that the administration had on a regular basis or eight euros regular basis with the business community they really think that they can guide this economy much better than the private sector can. i think that is dangerous. private obama kind of got diverted away from the economy and onto obamacare. at the inauguration, he talked about global warming and green technology. he talked about gun control. i did not hear him talk much about jobs. charles: at this point, it is a second term. he does not have to put up the faÇade anymore. almost everybody on there was a liberal. to your point, the president will now work on his legacy. his legacy has never had anything to do
part of my state are still not living in a security environment. we owe them that. at the same time, i think more and more americans are agreeing these 11 million people need to come out of the shadows and we need to give them a path to citizenship but not favoritism. >> senator mccain, you're exactly right. the polls are showing the majority of americans do support the type of proposal you and chuck schumer are putting forward. what would you say to conservative house republicans that will call anything you try to pat in t-- pass in the senat amnesty. >> i think we will and already are reaching across to our friendson the otherside talking and i think they realize the realities of the 21st century and there will be some difficulties and it's long hard path. i'm confident we will succeed. >> senator shuman, willie geist in new york, good to see you this morning. there's a piece in the "new york times" where a reporter goes to a diner in south carolina. the concern down there is people are being rewarded for illegal behavior, a, and b, being given priority over workers in america who ca
is have the person go over their memory as if it was happening again but they are in a safe environment. >> they say it looks like a video game but when you put the goggles on, it brings you to the same scenario. >> you put on the sounds, the sound of wind. >> and we can blow stuff up. >> therapy has been effective. i was never a fan of prolonged exposure and that kind of thing because it's an uncomfortable thing. >> at its core, therapy has to induce some level of anxiety so that you're processing hard memories. i'm skip, clinical psychologist at the university of california institute for creative technologies. let's go. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] introducing the all-new cadillac xts... another big night on the town, eh? ...and the return of life lived large. ♪ humans. even when we cross our t's and dot our i's, we still run into problems. namely, other humans. at liberty mutual insurance, we understand. that's why our auto policies come with accident forgiveness if you qualify, where your rates won't go up due to your first accident, and new car replacement, where, if you total
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